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20121202
20121210
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government should stick to the constitution. the state courts have nothing to say about it. we say no gay marriage, period. we should not go around and heard them. it is unnatural for a man to be with a man. i think we should have won solid law against it. host: why keep it at a government level and not at the state level? caller: look at what is going on now. we set a lot. everybody says, i interpret it this way or that way. it is causing more and more problems. we do that all of the time. man, woman, period. host: "the washington post" adds -- good morning from minnesota on the democrats' line. caller: thank you for c-span. this is what i have not heard said by both -- most of the things i have listened to or watched between the debates on gay marriage. it is all legal documents. some states have the take a blood test. you have to get a marriage license from your state or county. when you get married, you get married in a church. % a church document with witnesses. if you get a divorce, you cannot say i will wrap up this thing we signed a in church. you have to get attorneys and illegal
secretary of the treasury, alexander hamilton, observe energy is a leading character in good government. the president must lead in a divided government and must not advocate his or her responsibility. president obama has the responsibility to propose a real bipartisan plan to avert the fiscal cliff that can pass both the house and the senate. withdrawing from the recommendations of the simpson- bowles commission, the president could propose a plan that would not only avert the so-called fiscal cliff, but also help us avert the fiscal abyss. if president obama were to offer such a plan, republicans would act favorably. going over the cliff is unnecessary. as it has been observed in "the wall street journal," the president is boxing in the republicans. he is offering them a deal they cannot accept. first, the president has repeatedly called for a balanced solution involving both revenue and less spending. what is obvious to the most casual observer is that this plan is not a balanced. the fiscal cliff involves nearly four dollars of anticipated revenue from higher taxes for every dollar
of government, and the president is proposing to grow it more. to spend more. the problem is isn't tax policy, mr. speaker. the problem is spending. you know, mr. speaker, we hear a lot about fairness. i want to talk a little bit about that now. i'm going to switch to tax policy because that's what everybody seems to be obsessed with in the media. i want to make sure we dispel some of the myths of what's going on there. i went to dictionary.com as i'm apt to do, mr. speaker, and printed out what fair is. they said free from bias, dishonesty, or injustice. the first definition. free from bias, dishonesty, or injustice. and two, legitimately thought, pursued, done, or given proper under the rules. fair. but i think we all support fairness. i'm certain that we do, but i'm absolute certain what president obama believes is fair is different from what the people i represent believe is fair. and what i brought here, mr. speaker, is a chart from the joint committee on taxation, that's the group here on capitol hill that is in charge of measuring all the tax policy, it's a nonpartisan group, they just
home is the american dream. government support excessive borrowing has turned into a national nightmare, close quote. and the focus of that editorial was, we still haven't fundamentally reformed that, including at f.h.a. so i hope we start getting on that track starting today. thank you, mr. chairman. >> senator menendez. >> thank you very much. i'll be brief. i look forward to hearing the secretary's response on how f.h.a. balances the goals of remaining self-sufficient without taxpayer funds, but also helping what is still a fragile housing market in ensuring first-time home buyers can get credit. there is a clear case to be made in my mind that but for f.h.a. in the midst of this housing crisis, we would have a far greater crisis on our hands. and so reconciling the fiduciary responsibilities here to the taxpayers as well as the mission to people of america is incredibly important. i look forward to hearing that. and with your indulgence, mr. chairman, when it comes to my time in questions, while i certainly care about f.h.a., i have a even more pressing issue in the state of new jer
to fundamentally affect their lives. what is your sense -- from both of you? the government education and foreign-policy background. what the priorities be to fix the problem? >> maybe i will start and passed it to joel. i was also provost of stanford for six years. seeing the product of the educational system give me a perspective on what it is we need to try to achieve in that time. at stamford -- stanford, you see the very best. but if you have low expectations of even the best students, they will live down to them. [applause] i come at this with the belief that the most important thing is that what ever you are teaching them, you have to have very high standards. i am not much for the self- esteem movement. everybody gets the trophy. i am a musician myself and i think the arts are important. but how many of these little performances have you been to where kids are running all over the state and people say isn't that cute? well actually, no it's not, it would better if they practice and know something. my first his high standards, what ever you teach them. secondarily, i do believe the common
of the federal government. it isur job to protect people. it is our job to help communities rebuild when there are natural disasters that local governments just can't afford to be able to pay for on their own. now, new york has been working very hard to come up with a plan about how to rebuild. but the transportation infrastructure has taken an unbelievable beating. in new york alone, 2,000 miles of roads were destroyed or damage 11 tunnels were flooded. and our -- our city and our state really relies on mass transit. we are the number one users of mass transit in the country. and with our mass transit system, miles of tracks and tunnels were flooded with corrosive saltwater. 12 subway ations were damaged or destroyed, 500,000 transit riders are still experiencing severe disruptions. you will have the mta chairman come in which is fantastic. he can give you the nuts and bolts of the loss, the repairs, a lot of service is up and running now, b long-term repairs must be done. the storm just filled up the subways. when we builthese subways 100 years ago, they could not have imagined this ki
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6